Tag Archives: vegan

Meatless Monday Feast

Meatless Monday Feast for Two Hungry Humans

Do you have 40 minutes tonight to prepare your dinner?

Meatless Monday noise is over. It’s not a fad any more. It’s now alive and well to benefit all of us mortals. Eating exclusively plants at least once a week for an awesome return1 is not so bad:

The EPIC study found that vegan and vegetarian groups had a 32 percent lower risk of hospitalization or death from heart disease.1

We try on most “normal” days to go meatless. Not just Mondays. Check out how we made this easy feast. No one will ask you, “Where do you get your protein?” on this one.

Meatless Monday Feast

First, the salad…

Home Pantry Salad, Raw and Fresh

Home Pantry Salad, Raw and Fresh

True to the wild spirit of our kitchen, we went with the flow on what we had when we opened the fridge and the pantry.

1 bunch Romaine lettuce, organic
1 large mango, organic
2 handfuls dried Goji berries, organic
1 handful raw walnuts, organic
2 TBSP Chia seeds, organic

Raw salad ingredients.

Raw salad ingredients.

1. Chop off the bottom that holds lettuce together.
2. Wash lettuce and mango thoroughly.
3. Chop lettuce in whatever way you wish and place in salad bowl.
4. Peel the mango and slice in cubes; place on top of the chopped lettuce.
5. Sprinkle Goji berries, walnuts, and chia seeds.
6. Mix when ready to eat.

Next, the tofu…

Garlic Tofu Pan Steak

Garlic Tofu Pan Steak

So what do we have here?

1 box Nasoya Extra Firm Tofu, non-GMO, organic
1 bulb garlic, organic
Extra virgin coconut oil, organic
Bragg’s Amino (use tamari or soy sauce, if you prefer)
Ground black pepper
Garlic powder
Dried basil leaves
Sesame seeds

Veggie steak ingredients.

Veggie steak ingredients.

1. Chop tofu in blocks as shown above.
2. Mince garlic.
3. Heat 1 TBSP extra virgin coconut oil. Set to low heat.
4. Saute garlic till light brown.
5. Sear tofu.
6. While one side of tofu is being seared, season top of each block with Bragg’s Amino sauce, garlic powder, and basil sprinkles.
7. Flip tofu and repeat #6.
8. Flip tofu each way until both sides are light brown.
9. When ready to serve, top each block with sautéed garlic and sprinkle sesame seeds.

Now, the sides… rice 

Steamed Herbed Quinoa and Lentils

Steamed Herbed Quinoa and Lentils

I love white rice. But at some point, I needed to switch to low glycemic eating. I feel better. I weigh better. So proudly, I have mastered some happy edits to “rice” when I feel like enjoying some.

2 cups quinoa, organic
2 cups yellow/red lentils
Garlic powder
Himalayan pink salt
Bragg 24 herb sprinkle, organic

Electric rice cooker

Steamed herbed quinoa and lentils ingredients

Steamed herbed quinoa and lentils ingredients

1. Measure and pour two cups of quinoa and 2 cups of yellow lentils into the rice cooker.
2. Add a pinch of Himalayan pink salt.
3. Sprinkle some garlic power and Bragg’s 24 herb sprinkle.
4. Mix everything.
5. Add eight cups of water—my soft rule for steaming quinoa and lentils in a standard electric rice cooker is a ratio of 1 grain:2 water versus the usual white rice rule of 1 white rice: 1 water.
6. Turn the electric rice cooker switch to “cook rice” and let it go through its normal cooking cycle.

Last but not the least…

Mmm Green Mush

Mmm Green Mush

Never underestimate the power of dark greens. I just love greens in juices, smoothies, and sides.

1 bunch kale pulp, organic (saved from green juice)
1 bunch spinach pulp, organic (saved from green juice)
1 clove garlic, leftover from the tofu pan
1 lb snow pea pods
Ground black pepper
2 TBSP flax seeds, organic, ground fresh before use
Sesame seeds

Green mush ingredients.

Green mush ingredients.

1. Wash all vegetables thoroughly.
2. Cut hard ends of snow pea pods.
3. Chop snow pea pods.
4. Using the same cast iron skillet where the tofu was seared, reuse (with some of the coconut oil and garlic bits left) for quickly sautéing pea pods and green pulp. Make sure the setting is on low heat.
5. Sprinkle ground black pepper to taste.
6. When ready to serve, sprinkle two tablespoons of ground flax seeds and sesame seeds.

And, after eating all that, we are now pleasantly full.

The tiny oranges below are a good finish. Of course, drink plenty of fresh filtered water.

Clementines

Clementines

I hope you get to make some of these fun stuff for Meatless Mondays.

For now, my new season Walking Dead iTunes download is ready. Our real Monday night dessert. 🙂

Oh and by the way, each dish has all the protein you need. So no worries, just enjoy!

 

  1. Bradbury KE, Crowe FL, Appleby PN, Schmidt JA, Travis RC, Key, TJ. Serum concentrations of cholesterol, apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein B in a total of 1694 meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014;68:178-183.  [via Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine]

 

 

What is Wild Kitchen?

“Let food be thy medicine and let thy medicine be thy food.”
Hippocrates, c. 460 BC – c. 370 BC

My own health took a dramatic turn for the better when I ate more intelligently. My labs are good. I am plenty of pounds lighter. I have much more energy and vitality even as the years press on—I went from a non-runner to slow runner, I improved my swim in terms of endurance, distance, and technique (also helped along by a tri coach), I enjoy biking more and doing more distance than ever before.

So far, I have completed a half marathon (Austin Half), gazillion 5Ks, and two seasons of duathlons and short distance triathlons—I plan to keep going and increase distances at some point. This year, I also completed my first full marathon (Cincinnati Flying Pig), first 50K trail ultra (Another Dam 50K), and first Olympic distance tri (Tri Indy). I still have quite a way to go. And I am enjoying every bit of my journey.

wildkitchen

Kitchen creations are part of this journey. I’d like to share some of them here. I lean towards low glycemic, mostly plant-based, occasional pescatarian, and rarely omni dishes. I like to keep the food I prepare in its most original form as possible. I like knowing where my ingredients come from.

My principle is we should feel free and wild (if I may) in our own kitchens. There are recipes that must be respected like family traditions and there are recipes who’s role is to inspire and get us excited—energized while creating them and made healthier after enjoying them.

When the recipe book says “cashews” with “powdered onions” and when you open the pantry you only see walnuts and garlic powder, be unafraid and be creative with what you have.

This is what Wild Kitchen is about.

In this section of my blog, I’m sharing our young family’s kitchen experiments that will someday, hopefully, become our own traditions. It’s my way of documenting our favorite meals, juices, and smoothies.

Gerry experiments in the kitchen too—his specialties are soups, smoothies, and vegetable sautés. From time to time, he will share his concoctions here.

Enjoy and stay healthy!

p.s. Remember, it’s your kitchen. No worries. Be free.